Turkey Wines in the Wino House

What to drink with the ubiquitous turkey?

Year in and year out people beseech me with requests for the perfect pairing for your Thanksgiving meal. Not to mention the thousands of pitches I receive from wineries and PR folks claiming to have the best, most excellent ever, wine for your holiday feast.  Let’s get this out of the way: No perfect wine for Thanksgiving exists. Thanksgiving offers sweet, savory, sticky, dry, creamy, and a dozen other food adjectives, dishes. You would be asking for a miracle for something that goes well with both sweet potato marshmallow casserole and cranberry sauce (nothing goes with cranberry sauce).  With that said, I’ll tell you what I purchased/am pulling from the cellar for the feast in the Wannabe Wino household. Take that for what you will.

4 bottles of assorted sparkling – Prosecco, Cremant de Alsace, Champagne, and Brut from CA.

2 bottles of Chablis. I went to lunch last week with the folks from Pure Chablis (more on that later) and fell in love.

2 bottles of Gruner Veltliner. A family tradition.

1 bottle of Napa Sauvignon Blanc.

1 bottle of Sancerre.

4 bottles of Pinot Noir. All from the US, various appellations.

2 bottles of Cabernet Franc. One from Maryland and one from VA. Gotta represent locally.

Various local hard dry apple ciders.

Who wants to come over? Gobble gobble.

Happy Thanksgiving!

My little turkey says “Gobble gobble!”

From the Wannabe Wino Family to yours, wishing you a Thanksgiving full of family , friends, good food and wine!

Bubbles, Yum!

*Disclaimer: I received this wine as a sample from the PR firm for the winery

Oh how I love bubbles! I even made my own bubbles with some of my blogger friends in 2009.  It was just disgorged and shipped to us recently, I’m excited to tell you about it. Back to the point though. Bubbles. And yummy bubbles. You can’t beat that.  I’m adding another wine to my Thanksgiving wine recommendations for 2011.  The wine n question is the Domaine Carneros Cuvee de la Pompadour.  It clocks in at 12% alcohol by volume, has a traditional Champagne closure, and retails for about $30.

Four takeaways from this wine:

1.) I didn’t want to stop drinking this wine to take my notes because I was afraid Mr. Wannabe Wino would take more than his share while I took notes.

2.) This wine would be perfect with your turkey. It’s a rose and it’s a sparkling wine, can’t beat that!

3.) I would easily pay $30 for this wine.

4.) In fact, I will on my next wine buying trip.

On the nose I got raspberry, florals, cherry, slight apple, and wax notes.  In the mouth I found peach, pear, raspberry, and strawberry. On the palate the peach stood out the most, and tasted very fresh. Overall the wine had great bubbles and acidity and is bone dry.

 

Happy Thanksgiving!

To all my American readers, enjoy your turkey day! I hope you are able to spend the day with family, friends, good food, and of course, delicious wine!

Gobble Gobble!

I hope all those celebrating today enjoy a wonderful Thanksgiving with family and friends!

A Sight to See

I know this isn’t a food blog, but sometimes I can’t resist sharing what goes on in the Wannabe Wino kitchen. I think Matt wanted to compete, or at least show that he can do cool things too, with my delicious Thanksgiving meal…

so on the morning after Thanksgiving, he pulled out this.

And his drill (new drill bit that we sterilized for those who are concerned about that sort of thing!).

And he made a spectacle in the kitchen to impress our guests, serving them Ostrich Egg! He was inspired by “Battle Egg” on the Iron Chef and decided this was something we had to try. So he opened it and I cooked up a huge batch of scrambled eggs for our guests!

I suggest serving at your next brunch with Mimosas or perhaps a nice Moscato d’Asti.

Thanksgiving Recap

15 pounds of turkey (with all but a drumstick gone as of lunch today!)
10 pounds of potatoes
8 guests
6 bottles of wine
3 pounds of green beans
1 pounds of cranberries
1 package of burnt rolls (oops)
1 burn and 1 accidental grating of my thumb
=5 pounds heavier and one exhausted wine blogger.

Another Thanksgiving under my belt, my second, but my first in our new house!

Back to work and regularly scheduled blogging tomorrow, I hope everyone had an enjoyable Thanksgiving and didn’t have to loosen their belts too much!

Gobble Gobble

I am in full prep for Thanksgiving. Hosting for Matt’s family, 8 of us total. That’s the most people I’ve ever cooked a meal for, so I’m a wee bit nervous!

I’m not big on the whole “here’s my ultimate Thanksgiving pairings” post thing, but as an fyi, we are having an Austrian Riesling provided by Matt’s Aunt and Uncle, two lovely Roses, one from domaine547 and the other from WineQ, and a raspberry Merlot from a local vineyard for dessert. I’ve also got a few bottles of Pinot Noir stuck off to the side in case anyone wants some red with dinner!

I wish you and your’s a happy and safe Thanksgiving and I hope your turkeys cook perfectly! I’ll likely be off the posting while my house is full of relatives, but I’ll attempt to pop on.

Happy Thanksgiving!

Another Old Friend

Apparently this is the week where I revisit wines I tasted in November. Tonight it was a 2005 Felta Creek Summer White (De la Montanya). I first tasted the Summer White over Thanksgiving, but we had company and I didn’t exactly write the best notes, really just a general overview with perhaps one specific reference to the flavors. For some reason at the time I felt awkard sitting there writing detailed notes in front of company. Have since gotten over that though and now I explain what I’m doing since many of our friends don’t know I write a wine blog and I’ve certainly gotten confused looks when I whip out a note pad and bury my nose in the wine!

And again, since I tasted this wine quite a while ago I find myself wondering if I’m getting better at picking out flavors and aromas or if it was simply the lack of notes I took last time?

Anywho, the wine had a real cork closure and cost us $15.20 in a wine club shipment. I can’t find anything about the alcohol level and the bottle is long gone. I served it with ravioli topped with fresh parmesan and butter. And actually, I think my belief back in November that this would be a good Thanksgiving wine was spot on, as the buttery cheesy flavors in the ravioli were easily cut through by the crisp and acidic structure of this wine.

On the nose I found pineapple, papaya, citrus and an overall sense of tropical fruit. In the mouth I found citrs, green apple, pear and just the slightest tinge of honey. The wine was crisp and light and the tropical fruits made me want to be sitting in a hammock on a beach somwhere with crystal clear water. And sun, lots of sun. Perhaps I’m projecting my desire for better weather as it has once again turned cold and I think I heard a report of a “wintery mix” on the radio. Thankfully we are off to sunny shiny CA for a week and a bit, so I will miss some of the delightful ups and downs of Spring on the East Coast.

What do you serve with this:

I believe that is the question that many a wine lover (or blogger) has been asking him or herself over the past few weeks. This was the plate of food that was served to everyone at my house. Sweet potatoes with marshmellows, candied carrots, mashed potatoes with cheese, turkey, etc. Is there really a perfect wine to serve with this disharmonious collection of food that somehow all tastes good together?

I think the answer I have arrived at is that no, there is no perfect wine to serve. But that’s okay. Since nothing will go fantastically well, why not just serve what you like and add it into the mix of all the other random foods put together on a plate?

With that in mind, 4 bottles fell at our house on Thanksgiving. I was little off in my predictions. I thought we would drink 2 white, a red and a dessert. It ended up being 2 white, a dessert and a Champagne. As noted before, we let our guests choose off our pre-prepared list. My husband’s brother and his wife chose the first bottle, a 2005 Ferrari-Carano Sauvignon Blanc. My brother in law said it was because it had Ferrari in the name. Everyone seemed to like it, though I think most were more concerned with tasting all the food at the table than with the wine! It’s a slightly sweet sauvignon blanc with a good bit of citrus rounding out the flavor. I remember really enjoying this the day we tasted it and we do have another bottle hanging around for later. Cork closure, $15.

Next we moved on to a dessert wine, which was the choice my husband’s Aunt and Uncle. Being slightly wary of the VA dessert wines on the list, they chose a 2005 Bella Late Harvest Zinfandel. This was also a cork closure and cost $20.50. At 15% residual sugar, I expected this to be a very sweet wine, but it really reminded of a very young port. I thought it had a great finish, a lot of blackberry flavor and I probably should have served it with an assortment of chocolate, but, chocolate would not seem the dessert of choice for Thanksgiving.

Up third for the evening was a bottle of Preston Vineyards 2005 Dry Creek Valley Viognier. Cork closure, $22 after a case discount. If you ever have a chance, try Preston’s olive oils. They are superb and I only wish we had taken home a few bottles. This was a good choice for a wine to drink as we did, sitting around playing Trivial Pursuit. It was light and easy to drink, but surprisingly full in the mouth and very smooth going down. It had a bit of spice that I can’t place and maybe a hint of tropical fruit. This was my choice as I realized we were hunkering for a long battle of the wits.

Finally, to finish the evening, we opened the bottle of champagne that our Aunt and Uncle were so kind to bring. It was a G.H. Mumm & Cie. Cordon Rouge Brut. I gather it runs around $37 for the bottle and sadly the cork was thrown away before I could see what year it was. I thought this was a very tasty bottle and a great way to finish our evening. I tasted a lot of apple, and thought it was slightly sweet for a brut champagne. A good finish, with just a bit of yeasty undertone. I’d definetly get this bottle again.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 8,521 other followers