A shipping issue

Thanks to Dr. Debs for posting this timely (for me anyway) post on Wine Life Today that she found on Good Grape. The post is regarding the shipping of wine to consumers and how it’s a big issue facing the industry today.

And I must agree. Especially given that I just got royally screwed by UPS. A shipment of 6 bottles was scheduled (per the phone call of UPS) to arrive at my home on Friday. I went home early to wait for it. And I waited. And waited. And it did not come. So I think maybe it got shipped to our old apartment. I went over there. And nothing. I harass the front desk people into showing me the package log for Friday to make sure it didn’t get sent there. Nothing.

I call today to track it. Supposedly UPS came and left a notice on our door at 6:47PM on Friday. Well, apparently this was a ghost UPS truck and a ghost notice, because let me tell you, it wasn’t there. I may be oblivious at times, but I certainly don’t miss it when people ring the doorbell or when missed package notices are taked to my front door.

So now, my beautiful wine that cost $170 has been sitting in a hot warehouse the entire LONG weekend. That’s 3 full days, plus 2 full dasy today being driven around in our achingly hot weather. I fear the worst dear wine lovers: my wine will be cooked. I am doubly irritated and pissed off due to the fact that I was sitting in my living room when this was supposedly delivered.

PS: Even more irritated now that I just found out they will attempt to deliver at 4 today. No one will be there and every other time UPS has come, they arrive around 7. When we are home. Of course, not today though.

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Wine with a Smile

Pulling up to Yoakim Bridge reminded me of pulling up to a cabin to go camping at. The winery was rustic and looked very inviting. And, as many people say, first impressions are often right; everything about Yoakim Bridge was inviting. The winery is only open to the public Friday-Sunday, unless you call for an appointment. Tasting fee is supposedly $10, though we were not asked for it and it was never mentioned.

Walking into the tasting room, we were immediately greeted very exhuberantly by Virginia, one of the two owners of Yoakim Bridge. We were then offered meatballs, which she had simmering in a crock pot behind the tasting bar. And they were delicious, made in their own special wine sauce. Virginia made sure we were red wine drinkers, as, in her words: “We don’t do white wines here, we’re red only!” Much to the disappointment of the people who walked in behind us, as they were looking for white wines and walked away with out even tasting, despite our encouragement to try something new….red is divine!

Yoakim Bridge is a very small operation. They’ve been around for just over 10 years and don’t have any tasting room help, just the two owners, both of whom were pouring wine that Friday. Along with the very friendly and adorable winery dogs. I would highly recommend a visit to Yoakim Bridge. The wines were delicious, the people fantastic and the atmosphere great, even after we got home, we got a personal email from Virginia thanking us for visiting and for purchasing wine. Little things like that go a long way with me.

2001 Dry Creek Valley Zinfandel: $32. Raspberry and chocolate on the nose. Oak and raspberries in the mouth with a long finish. Could age longer in my opinion. We took home 2 bottles.

2004 Dry Creek Valley Zinfandel: $32. Pepper, blackberry and oak. Overall, quite spicy!

2004 Dry Creek Valley Merlot: $34. Toasty, with the distinct scent of sausage. Strawberries and spice in the mouth, I relaly liked the flavors in this one.

Three Valley Cuvee NV: $34. Violets and other flowers on the nose. Mint, and dried raspberries, the tannins were heavy on this wine. The grapes come from 13 differents vineyards.

2002 Dry Creek Valley Syrah: $34. Dark fruit, blackberries and blueberries. Vanilla notes and spice. Definitely age this one longer.